Today I recommend listening to the podcast “You Must Remember This.” It’s on its fifth season right now, and focusing on stories of the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio. So far Karina Longworth and cast have covered:

  • The genesis of MGM as a merged studio after Marcus Loew (of Loews theatres) took control Metro, Goldwyn, and Mayer studios.
  • The relationship between silent star Marion Davies and W.R. Hearst, and the inspirations behind Citizen Kane.
  • Buster Keaton’s move to MGM from an independent studio.

A number of these MGM stories discuss the transition from silent films to ones with sound. MGM was one of the last studios to make the transition, and the podcast implies that it was because they waited for all the technical glitches and bugs to get sorted out by other people. 

In another episode it’s posited that many film stars began their descendency during the transition to talkies because for audiences, actors were ciphers, empty vessels into which moviegoers poured their own dreams and ideals. Once heard, a movie star could no longer serve as a projection, and became finite or diminished in a way. Because of these episodes, I’m developing more of an appreciation of the art of silent cinema, and some hindsight-sympathy for those who didn’t quite make it into the sound era.

In 1977, the New York Times writer Guy Flatley wrote a piece on the 50th anniversary of sound in film. Here is Flatley on the way sound changed the visuals of film:

Most important of all, perhaps, was the drastic change in the look of movies. Cameras could no longer move freely, since the cameraman was now cramped into a huge soundproof booth, his camera robbed of almost all action.

And on the actors who didn’t make it:

Actors and actresses who shared the industry’s disdain for sound paid the highest price, especially those cursed with crude dialects or vocal idiosyncrasies that made a mockery of their meticulously manufactured personalities. It was tragically late in the game for these stars to begin the awesome task of learning elocution, the tricky chore of mastering their native tongue.

It’d be neat to find the story of an elocutionist during the advent of talkies, hired by the studios to teach actors an entirely new kind of acting. In the meantime, I can watch The King’s Speech, or Pygmalion. “You Must Remember This” is a very good podcast, well-researched and wrought with care. I recommend it.

Please go subscribe to You Must Remember This

Further listening: Host Karina Longworth on the Longform Podcast in an episode about finding your way out of an inert career and into a viable passion project.

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