The Search For Summer’s Song: 65 & Ingleside

The Search For Summer’s Song: 65 & Ingleside

Regardless of how many of our storied institutions have broken beyond repair, I can’t imagine a timeline in which The Onion is irrelevant. “Chance The Rapper Clarifies He From Chicago” is one of its latest headlines, an obscure, esoteric joke. It is unshareable. It is unviral. I love it.

I finished my master’s creative writing program last week, and I walked across the stage while a professor read a line from my thesis. “My favorite yoga pose is corpse pose because it will be my final pose.” He read it in a deliberate, rhythmic way that I can never replicate, and in doing so he drew an auditorium to laughter.

I traffic almost entirely in the obscure, esoteric joke—so much so that I’m deep into a manuscript of dumb cracks about colonial New England townships. Will this be a book you’d purchase? I’m not sure I care. As a project, it keeps me occupied, keeps me from whatever deep darkness waits in the wings.

Chance provides a balm. He is from Chicago and he doesn’t much care that you know its grids and buildings, its vocab or shiny gaudy sculptures. Once I ate a vegan hotdog in Wrigleyville. Once I made a table of enemies in Logan Square when I started a Scrabble game with a bingo. “KERATIN,” I wrote on my first turn. My opponents couldn’t catch up, and at the end of the night when I slept on the couch of an old college friend’s, this friend said to me before turning out the lights, “You shouldn’t have played that in your first turn. Now everyone thinks I was a nerd in college.” Sorry, Matthew.

Perhaps this is summer’s song: one of the four songs Chance released this week.

“65 & Ingleside” by Chance The Rapper is another result in my search for summer’s song. The last one was “Fast Slow Disco” by St. Vincent.

The Search for Summer’s Song: Fast Slow Disco

The Search for Summer’s Song: Fast Slow Disco

Another of my summer side hustles is my t-shirt kiosk at Old Orchard Beach in Maine. Old Orchard Beach is like if the Jersey Shore had a younger brother with leprosy. It’s like if a tie-dyed tank top came to life and got an advanced degree in city planning. If you want to see coastal Maine tourism in its most debauched and eerie form, then you go to Old Orchard Beach, find the one bench that isn’t soaked with ass sweat, and watch the people.

But I can’t say any of this to my customers, who pause and marvel at the many t-shirts and tank tops I offer at my t-shirt kiosk business, which I named “TONEE’S OOB TEES, 2 FOR $20 ONLY.”

The one shirt that elicits the biggest chuckle—and is also my number one seller—is the black t-shirt that reads “I’M JUST AN OLD ORCHARD BITCH” in bright pink lettering. It is disgusting, and I hate myself for coming up with the idea, and I hate how capitalism encouraged me, and I hate it, especially hate it, when a kid walks by and laughs at the shirt and then says it aloud to even louder laughs from his parents. Still, I smile graciously when they hand me a crisp twenty and I hand them two vulgar shirts.

Perhaps this is the song of my summer: an uptempo version of a track off St. Vincent’s Masseduction from 2017. One line captures it, I think: I’m so glad I came but I can’t wait to leave.

This is the second result in my annual search for summer’s song. The first was Cardi B’s “Be Careful.”